Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Basis of Presentation

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Basis of Presentation
9 Months Ended
Sep. 30, 2018
Organization, Consolidation and Presentation of Financial Statements [Abstract]  
Basis of Presentation
Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies
The accompanying interim condensed consolidated financial statements of Natus Medical Incorporated (“Natus,” or the “Company”) have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”). Except where noted below within Note 1, the accounting policies followed in the preparation of the interim condensed consolidated financial statements are consistent in all material respects with those presented in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017.
Interim financial reports are prepared in accordance with the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission; accordingly, the reports do not include all of the information and notes required by GAAP for annual financial statements. The interim financial information is unaudited, and reflects all normal adjustments that are, in the opinion of management, necessary for the fair presentation of our financial position, results of operations, and cash flows for the interim periods presented. The consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2017 was derived from audited financial statements, but does not include all disclosures required by GAAP. The accompanying financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017.
Operating results for the three and nine months ended September 30, 2018 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2018. The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.
Recent Adopted Accounting Pronouncements
In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standard Update No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606) (“ASU 2014-09”), which supersedes nearly all existing revenue recognition guidance. The standard's core principle is that an entity should recognize revenue when it transfers promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The standard creates a five-step model to achieve its core principle: (i) identify the contract(s) with a customer; (ii) identify the performance obligations in the contract; (iii) determine the transaction price; (iv) allocate the transaction's price to the separate performance obligations in the contract; and (v) recognize revenue when (or as) the entity satisfies a performance obligation. In addition, entities must disclose sufficient information to enable users of financial statements to understand the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. Qualitative and quantitative disclosures are required about: (i) the entity's contracts with customers; (ii) the significant judgments, and changes in judgments, made in applying the guidance to those contracts; and (iii) any assets recognized from the costs to obtain or fulfill a contract with a customer.
The Company adopted the new revenue standard on January 1, 2018, without any material impact to its accounting policies or its reported results. The Company utilized the modified retrospective method of transition and applied a practical expedient permitting the Company to not disclose the consideration allocated to the remaining performance obligations or an explanation of when the Company expects to recognize revenue for all reporting periods presented before January 1, 2018, the date of initial application.
In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-16, Income Taxes (Topic 740). This update is to remove the prohibition in ASC 740 against the immediate recognition of the current and deferred income tax effects of intra-entity transfers of assets other than inventory. Under the ASU, the selling entity is required to recognize any current tax expense or benefit upon transfer of the asset. Similarly, the purchasing entity is required to recognize a deferred tax asset or deferred tax liability, as well as the related deferred tax benefit or expense, upon receipt of the asset. The Company adopted this guidance on a modified retrospective basis on January 1, 2018, recognizing a charge to retained earnings of approximately $3.9 million which reflects the unamortized portion of the deferred tax asset for both the consideration as well as the reserve.
In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-01, Business Combinations (Topic 805). This update is to clarify the definition of a business with the objective of adding guidance to assist entities with evaluating whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisition (or disposals) of assets or businesses. The definition of a business affected many areas of accounting including acquisitions, disposals, goodwill, and consolidation. The adoption of this guidance prospectively on January 1, 2018 did not have an impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements.
In May 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-09, Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Scope of Modification Accounting. This update provides guidance about which changes to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award require an entity to apply modification accounting in Topic 718. The adoption of this guidance prospectively on January 1, 2018 did not have an impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements.
In August 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-12, Derivatives and Hedging (Topic 815): Targeted Improvements to Accounting for Hedging Activities. This update amends and simplifies existing hedge accounting guidance and allows for more hedging strategies to be eligible for hedge accounting. In addition, the ASU amends disclosure requirements and how hedge effectiveness is assessed. Effective January 1, 2018, the Company elected to early adopt ASU 2017-12. The adoption of this standard did not have an impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements.
In June 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-07, Compensation - Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Nonemployee Share-Based Payment Accounting. This update simplifies the accounting for share-based payments made to nonemployees so the accounting for such payments is substantially the same as those made to employees. Under this ASU, share based awards to nonemployees will be measured at fair value on the grant date of the awards. Entities will need to assess the probability of satisfying performance conditions if any are present, and awards will continue to be classified according to ASC 718 upon vesting. This eliminates the need to reassess classification upon vesting, consistent with awards granted to employees. This ASU is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years, and early adoption is permitted. The Company elected to early adopt ASU 2018-07 effective July 1, 2018 and the adoption of this standard did not have an impact on the Company's consolidated financial statements.
Recent Issued Accounting Pronouncements
In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842). This standard requires lease assets and lease liabilities arising from operating leases to be presented in the statement of financial position. Qualitative along with specific quantitative disclosures are required by lessees and lessors to meet the objective of enabling users of financial statements to assess the amount, timing, and uncertainty of cash flows arising from leases. ASU 2016-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018 including interim periods within those fiscal years. In July 2018, FASB issued ASU 2018-10, Codification Improvements to Topic 842, Leases, which affects narrow aspects of the guidance issued in the amendments in Update 2016-02. In July 2018, the FASB also issued ASU 2018-11, Targeted Improvements. The amendments in ASU 2018-11 provide additional clarification and implementation guidance on certain aspects of the previously issued ASU 2016-02 and have the same effective and transition requirements as ASU 2016-02. The Company is in the process of evaluating the impact of this standard on its consolidated financial statements. The Company has selected a lease software solution and is in the process of identifying changes to the business processes, systems and controls to support the adoption of this standard. While the Company is still evaluating the impact of this new standard on the consolidated financial statements, it is expected to result in a significant increase in total assets and total liabilities on the balance sheet.
In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other (Topic 350). This update modifies the concept of impairment from the condition that exists when the carrying amount of goodwill exceeds its implied fair value to the condition that exists when the carrying amount of a reporting unit exceeds its fair value. An entity no longer will determine goodwill impairment by calculating the implied fair value of goodwill by assigning the fair value of a reporting unit to all of its assets and liabilities as if that reporting unit had been acquired in a business combination. Because these amendments eliminate Step 2 from the goodwill impairment test, they should reduce the cost and complexity of evaluating goodwill for impairment. ASU 2017-04 is effective for the Company's annual and any interim goodwill impairment tests performed on or after January 1, 2020. The Company does not expect the adoption of ASU 2017-04 to have a material impact on its consolidated financial statements.
In February 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-02, Income Statement - Reporting Comprehensive Income (Topic 220). This update permits a company to reclassify its disproportionate income tax effects of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the “2017 Act”) on items within accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) to retained earnings (termed “stranded tax effects”). Only the stranded tax effects resulting from the 2017 Act are eligible for reclassification. The ASU also requires certain new disclosures, some of which are applicable for all companies. The ASU is effective for the Company on January 1, 2019. The Company is in the process of evaluating the impact of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.
In July 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-09, Codification Improvements. This update makes changes to a variety of topics to clarify, correct errors in, or make minor improvements to the Accounting Standard Codification. The majority of the amendments in ASU 2018-09 will be effective for us in annual periods beginning after December 15, 2018. The Company is in the process of evaluating the impact of this standard on its consolidated financial statements.
In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-13 Fair Value Measurement (Topic 813), Disclosure Framework-Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement. This update amends Topic 820 to add, remove, and clarify disclosure requirements related to fair value measurement disclosure. For calendar year-end entities, the update will be effective for annual periods beginning January 1, 2020, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption of the amendments is permitted, including adoption in any interim period. As the standard relates only to disclosures, the Company does not expect the adoption to have a material impact on the consolidated financial statements and is still evaluating if it will early adopt.
Significant Accounting Policies
Revenue Recognition
Revenue is recognized when obligations under the terms of a contract with a customer are satisfied; generally this occurs with the transfer of control of devices, supplies, or services. Revenue is measured as the amount of consideration the Company expects to receive in exchange for transferring goods or providing services.
For the majority of devices and supplies, the Company transfers control and recognizes revenue when products ship from the warehouse to the customer. The Company generally does not provide rights of return on devices and supplies. Freight charges billed to customers are included in revenue and freight-related expenses are charged to cost of revenue.
Depending on the terms of the arrangement, the Company may also defer the recognition of a portion of the consideration received because it has to satisfy a future obligation (e.g. installation). Judgment is required to determine the standalone selling price (“SSP”) for each distinct performance obligation. The Company uses a single amount to estimate SSP for items that are not sold separately. In instances where SSP is not directly observable, such as when the Company does not sell the product or service separately, the SSP is determined using information that may include market conditions and other observable inputs.
The Company sells separately-priced service contracts that extend maintenance coverages for both medical devices and data management systems beyond the base agreements to customers. The separately priced service contracts range from 12 months to 36 months. The Company receives payment at the inception of the contract and recognizes revenue ratably over the service period.
For products containing embedded software, the Company determined the hardware and software components function together to deliver the products' essential functionality and are considered a combined performance obligation. Revenue recognition policies for sales of these products are substantially the same as for other tangible products.
The following information summarizes the Company's contract assets and liabilities (in thousands):
 
September 30, 2018
 
December 31, 2017
Contract Assets
$
3,150

 
$
2,884

Deferred Revenue
$
20,866

 
$
18,901


Contract assets for the periods presented primarily represent the difference between revenue recognized based on the relative selling price of the related performance obligations and the contractual billing terms in the arrangements. Deferred revenue for the periods presented was primarily related to extended service contracts, installation, and training, for which the service fees are billed up-front. The associated deferred revenue is generally recognized ratably over the extended service period or when installation and training are complete.    
The following table summarized the changes in the contract assets and contract liability balances for the nine months ended September 30, 2018:
Unbilled AR, December 31, 2017
$
2,884

Additions
607

Transferred to Trade Receivable
(341
)
Unbilled AR, September 30, 2018
$
3,150

Deferred Revenue, December 31, 2017
$
18,901

Additions
14,132

Revenue Recognized
(12,167
)
Deferred Revenue, September 30, 2018
$
20,866


At September 30, 2018, the short-term portion of the contract liability of $16.8 million and the long-term portion of $4.0 million were included in deferred revenue and other long term liabilities respectively, in the consolidated balance sheet. As of September 30, 2018, the Company is expected to recognize revenue associated with deferred revenue of approximately $6.3 million for the remainder of 2018, $11.2 million in 2019, $1.8 million in 2020, $0.9 million in 2021, and $0.7 million thereafter.
Financial Instruments and Derivatives
As part of a risk management strategy, the Company may enter into derivative contracts with various counterparts. All derivatives are recognized on the balance sheet at their estimated fair value. On the date a derivative contract is entered into, it is designated as a fair value hedge, a cash flow hedge, a foreign currency fair value or cash flow hedge, a hedge of net investment in a foreign operation, or a trading or non-hedging instrument.
Changes in the estimated fair value of a derivative which is highly effective and that is designated and qualifies as a cash flow hedge, to the extent that the hedge is effective, are initially recorded in other comprehensive income. Subsequently when the variability of cash flows of the hedged transaction affects earnings, it is reclassified into earnings as a component of interest expense. Any hedge ineffectiveness, which represents the amount by which the changes in the estimated fair value of the derivative differ from the variability in the cash flows of the forecasted transaction, is recognized in current-period earnings as a component of interest expense. When an interest rate swap designated as a cash flow hedge no longer qualifies for hedge accounting, changes in estimated fair value of the hedge previously reflected in accumulated other comprehensive income, along with any changes in estimated fair value occurring thereafter, are recognized in earnings. Cash flows from interest rate swap agreements are classified as net cash provided from operating activities on the consolidated statements of cash flows. The Company's accounting policy is to present the cash flows from the hedging instruments in the same category in the consolidated statements of cash flows as the category for the cash flows the hedged items.